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Facts and figures - Singapore and its new street circuit 26 Sep 2008

Circuit at night.
Formula One World Championship, Rd 15, Singapore Grand Prix, Preparations, Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore, Thursday, 25 September 2008 Sebastien Bourdais (FRA) Scuderia Toro Rosso.
Formula One World Championship, Rd 15, Singapore Grand Prix, Preparations, Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore, Thursday, 25 September 2008 Circuit at night.
Formula One World Championship, Rd 15, Singapore Grand Prix, Preparations, Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore, Thursday, 25 September 2008 McLaren pitstop practice.
Formula One World Championship, Rd 15, Singapore Grand Prix, Preparations, Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore, Thursday, 25 September 2008 Tyres.
Formula One World Championship, Rd 15, Singapore Grand Prix, Preparations, Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore, Thursday, 25 September 2008

This weekend will see Formula One racing enjoy two firsts - its inaugural event in Singapore and its maiden night race. As the teams busy themselves adapting to a rather unusual weekend timetable, here’s a handful of interesting facts and figures to help you get better acquainted with the city and the track…

- The new anti-clockwise 5.067-kilometre (3.148-mile) street track is located in the heart the city, with its famous skyline, scenic harbour and Padang Park all used to great effect. Made up of public roads, the Formula One drivers will race down the historic Raffles Boulevard, as well as cross over Anderson Bridge and under a grandstand.

- This weekend’s Grand Prix will be the first night-time event in Formula One history. The timing of the night event, with the race getting underway at 2000 hours local time, means it can be broadcast at a convenient time for European television audiences, whilst also thrilling local fans.

- Singapore is the smallest country in South East Asia, with its 63 islands making up a surface area of just 684 square kilometres (264 square miles). The event will be the second race of the season to be held in a city state, Monaco being the other. The Singapore circuit, however, is wider and faster than the one used in Monte Carlo.

- An average speed of about 175km/h has been calculated for the circuit, with drivers expected to reach approximately 290km/h along the main straight. In contrast to the recent inaugural Valencia event, the Singapore track’s slower corners make it a high-downforce circuit.

- With most of the action taking place after the sun sets, the entire circuit will be floodlit with the help of over 108,423 metres of power cables, 240 steel pylons and around 1,500 light projectors. The light created is expected to be four times brighter than that used at sports stadiums.

- As well as making history as Formula One racing’s first-ever night race, the race will also mark the introduction of electronic flag displays to the sport. The new technology will be used in conjunction with the traditional flag signals waved by marshals. Thirty five display panels will be situated around the Singapore track, each controlled by handheld panels operated by officials at each marshals’ post.

- As with the recent Valencia event, teams have been hard at work on their simulators assessing the circuit ahead of their debut appearance. Lap time simulations have been run with a variety of different car configurations, while the data generated has allowed personnel to determine weight distribution and spring and damper settings. The only unknown quantities on Friday will be grip levels and the degree of tyre wear.

- In contrast to standard team policy for flyaway races, most drivers will not readjust their body clocks to the time difference. They will be expected to work into the small hours and therefore most are expected to carry on as if it was a normal European race and not pay attention to whether it’s light or dark.

- The pit building for the event is a permanent three-storey structure located on the city’s Marina Promenade. Whilst the ground floor features garages for 12 teams, the second and third levels house race control facilities, the media centre, the winners’ podium and a Paddock Club large enough for up to 4,000 guests.

- Official Formula One tyre supplier Bridgestone will bring soft and super-soft tyres to the Singapore race. The Japanese company will use special reflective paint to mark the super-soft and extreme-wet compounds to helps the media and fans to differentiate between rubber.