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F1 in Schools pit stops with Red Bull in Milton Keynes 16 Dec 2011

F1 in Schools World Finals, Ngee Ann Polytechnic, Singapore, 22 September 2010. © F1 in Schools The Penta Gliders Tasmania - F1 in Schools World Champions (L to R): Tristian McCarthy; Amy Winter; Nathan Clark; Jack Ball. 
Formula One World Championship, Rd 14, Singapore Grand Prix, Preparations, Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore, Thursday, 22 September 2011 The Penta Gliders Tasmania - F1 in Schools World Champions.
Formula One World Championship, Rd 14, Singapore Grand Prix, Preparations, Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore, Thursday, 22 September 2011 F1 in Schools teams, Ngee Ann Polytechnic, Singapore, 21 September 2010. © F1 in Schools

Visitors to Red Bull’s celebration event in Milton Keynes last weekend not only had the chance to watch world champion Sebastian Vettel and Mark Webber carry out demonstration runs, they could also race a Formula One car of the future in the UK town’s shopping centre.

F1 in Schools, the Formula One Technology Challenge, linked up with the team and local council to showcase the global educational initiative and give shoppers the opportunity to learn more about the student programme, which challenges 9-19 year-olds to design, build, test and race a miniature scale-model F1 car.

“Taking the F1 in Schools Technology Challenge into the Milton Keynes shopping centre, on the same day that Red Bull Racing held their special celebrations exposed the programme to over 60,000 people congregating in the city for a rare opportunity to see the championship-winning team up close in their home town,” explained Andrew Denford, F1 in Schools founder and chairman.

“The Challenge was very popular with young and old alike and I have no doubt that we will be seeing more schools in the area introducing the programme in the coming months. “The appetite for Formula One is insatiable and our programme brings students closer to the sport, while also putting into practice many key areas of learning.

“We know that the programme can improve the skills of students, whether this is within specific academic subjects or the life and social skills needed for a successful career. We’re now seeing F1 in Schools participants enter F1 and other engineering sectors, either in full-time employment or work placements, as a direct result of their involvement in the programme.

“It is a very rewarding initiative for the students and we hope that being able to share the programme with the visitors to Milton Keynes on Saturday will encourage even more schools to become involved.”

As well as finding out about the challenge, those children and parents in attendance also had the opportunity to test their reaction times racing example cars on the demonstration track. F1 in Schools is contested in 34 countries and over 17,000 students participated in this year’s competition.

For more information on F1 in Schools and to register to participate, see www.f1inschools.com.