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Heidfeld’s icy drive in St Moritz 05 Feb 2007

BMW Sauber Formula One driver Nick Heidfeld drives his car on the frozen lake of St. Moritz during a demonstration run on the sidelines of the White Turf international horse races in St. Moritz, Switzerland, Saturday, February 4, 2007. © BMW Sauber German racing driver Nick Heidfeld, centre, gets out of his BMW Sauber Formula One car after racing over the frozen Lake of St. Moritz on the sidelines of the first weekend of White Turf races in St. Moritz, Switzerland, Sunday, February 4, 2007. © BMW Sauber German racing driver Nick Heidfeld drives his BMW Sauber Formula 1 car over the frozen Lake of St. Moritz on the sidelines of the first weekend of White Turf races in St. Moritz, Switzerland, Sunday, February 4, 2007. © BMW Sauber German racing driver Nick Heidfeld speaks at a press conference ahead of his ride with his BMW Sauber Formula One car over the frozen Lake of St. Moritz on the sidelines of the first weekend of White Turf races in St. Moritz, Switzerland, Sunday, February 4, 2007. © BMW Sauber BMW Sauber Formula One pilot Nick Heidfeld is prepared for a demonstration run on the frozen lake of St. Moritz on the sidelines of the White Turf international horse races in St. Moritz, Switzerland, Saturday, February 3, 2007. © BMW Sauber

Nick Heidfeld swapped tarmac for ice on Sunday, when he drove his BMW Sauber Formula One car across the frozen lake of St. Moritz in Switzerland. Heidfeld’s demonstration run, part of the celebrations marking the centennial of White Turf, the town’s prestigious horse racing event, was watched by a crowd of more than 15,000 spectators.

“That was quite a unique experience - just seeing the magnificent mountain scenery surrounding the lake is really impressive,” explained Heidfeld. “The frozen track was of course much rougher than what I'm used to in Formula One. Although it was by no means easy to apply force on such a surface, I enjoyed the drive immensely.”

Heidfeld’s run was made possible thanks to the efforts of an eight-man crew that had started preparations the Friday before the event, two truckloads of equipment, and special spiked tires from Bridgestone. They also had to warm up the engine every half hour to keep it from freezing.

Although the tricky surface prevented Heidfeld from going too fast, the German pulled off a series of spectacular manoeuvres - to the delight of the spectators.