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American team planning 2010 championship entry 24 Feb 2009

L-R: Ken Anderson (USA) and Peter Windsor (GBR) prepare for the live announcement of their planned US-based Formula One team. Speed TV Channel, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. Tuesday 24 February 2009. World © Sutton Peter Windsor (GBR) at the live announcement of their planned US-based Formula One team. Speed TV Channel, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. Tuesday 24 February 2009. World © Sutton Ken Anderson (USA) at the live announcement of the planned US-based Formula One team. Speed TV Channel, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. Tuesday 24 February 2009. World © Sutton (L to R): Peter Windsor (GBR) and Ken Anderson (USA) at the launch of their planned US-based team, Speed TV Channel, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. Tuesday 24 February 2009. World © Sutton

Plans have been officially announced for a new, American Formula One team, who hope to be on the grid for the start of the 2010 season. The project, led by F1 veterans Peter Windsor and Ken Anderson, will be based in Charlotte, North Carolina, with European satellite facilities likely to be located in Spain.

The team say their mission is ‘to prove that American technology, American drivers and the American competitive spirit can compete and win on the F1 global stage’.

Though the team have yet to make any firm decisions on drivers or engine supply, they plan to take full advantage of Formula One racing’s latest cost-cutting measures, which they believe will help them to take a new and highly efficient approach to running an F1 operation.

"If you look at the way it has gone in the recent past, it has been to find an incredibly rich trillionaire and have him dominate the team - and you are lucky enough to get a job when you've put the team together," said Windsor in a press conference announcing the project. "Or you are lucky enough to be invited by a large car company to set up an F1 team for them.

“Ken and I are lucky enough to have been around long enough not to want to do either of those things - and we always wanted to do our own team our way. It perhaps sounds very arrogant, but we have some history and we have some things that we want to bring into the sport that we think we can do well."

Windsor and Anderson claim to have plans in place to raise the necessary capital, part of which has come through securing a small equity partner for the team.

"The key was not selling anything more than a very small stake in the team, so we set some unbelievably steep hills to climb in the recession," said Windsor. "We wanted to sell off a small part of the team and, as we sit here now, we have done that.

"We are two guys who can say we want to do an F1 team because we have the capital to do it, and to some extent the recession has helped us a little bit. We have always had a very different approach - and that approach will become visible as this year unfolds."

The recent ban on in-season testing, plus the high number of Grands Prix outside Europe, also means that Windsor and Anderson are not expecting the team’s unusual location to present any major logistical problems.

"Most of the technology in F1 comes from the US to begin with, and on the logistics side, this year less than half the races take place on the (European) continent so there is less reason for being there," said Anderson. "And the cost of doing business in the US is significantly lower than in Europe - and there are lots of good people here."

British-born Windsor, a former Williams team manager and best known of late as a Formula One commentator on US television, will take on the position of sporting director, while American engineer Anderson, recently responsible for the highly-acclaimed Windshear wind tunnel facility in North Carolina, will reprise the technical director role he previously held with the Ligier Formula One team back in the 1980s.