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Webber loses a second, Trulli loses his voice 29 May 2004

Mark Webber (AUS) Jaguar.
Formula One World Championship, Rd 7, European Grand Prix, Nurburgring, Germany, Practice, 28 May 2004 (L to R): Jarno Trulli (ITA) Renault learns how to mix on the decks with DJ Tom Novy (GER).
Formula One World Championship, Rd 7, European Grand Prix, Nurburgring, Germany, Practice, 28 May 2004 Mark Webber (AUS) Jaguar R5.
Formula One World Championship, Rd 7, European Grand Prix, Nurburgring, Germany, Practice, 28 May 2004 Jarno Trulli (ITA) Renault R24.
Formula One World Championship, Rd 7, European Grand Prix, Nurburgring, Germany, Practice, 28 May 2004

Mark Webber’s European Grand Prix hopes have been dealt a blow after news that one second will be added to the Jaguar driver’s qualifying time as punishment for a yellow flag infringement.

According to race stewards at the Nurburgring, Webber was penalised for setting a personal best sector time during Friday’s second practice session while the stricken Sauber of Felipe Massa was being recovered under yellow flags.

The penalty is likely to cost Webber several places on the grid for Sunday’s race. The Australian was 12th fastest in Saturday morning’s final practice session ahead of qualifying.

Meanwhile, there are difficulties of a different kind for Renault’s Jarno Trulli. The Italian lost his voice earlier this week, presenting problems not just for the media, who have tried in vain to record the thoughts of Formula One racing's newest Grand Prix winner, but also for his race engineers.

"Jarno losing his voice has been another small challenge to adapt to this weekend," said Renault’s Executive Director of Engineering Pat Symonds. "He and his race engineer Alan (Permane) have been communicating in writing. Each time Jarno comes back into the garage, he has a pen and paper in the car, and he has been writing answers to the questions Alan asks.”

If the situation doesn’t improve in time for Sunday’s race, Renault admit they will have to employ a little lateral-thinking to stay in touch with their driver. "In effect, Jarno will end up communicating over the radio by a form of morse code that we will devise this evening," added Symonds.