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Sebastian Vettel Q&A: No-one likes getting beaten 03 Oct 2013

Sebastian Vettel (GER) Red Bull Racing.
Formula One World Championship, Rd14, Korean Grand Prix, Preparations, Korea International Circuit, Yeongam, South Korea, Thursday, 3 October 2013 Race winner Sebastian Vettel (GER) Red Bull Racing RB9 crosses the line.
Formula One World Championship, Rd13, Singapore Grand Prix, Race, Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore, Sunday, 22 September 2013 Sebastian Vettel (GER) Red Bull Racing.
Formula One World Championship, Rd14, Korean Grand Prix, Preparations, Korea International Circuit, Yeongam, South Korea, Thursday, 3 October 2013 Sebastian Vettel (GER) Red Bull Racing RB9.
Formula One World Championship, Rd13, Singapore Grand Prix, Race, Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore, Sunday, 22 September 2013 Race winner Sebastian Vettel (GER) Red Bull Racing celebrates on the podium.
Formula One World Championship, Rd13, Singapore Grand Prix, Race, Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore, Sunday, 22 September 2013 Race winner Sebastian Vettel (GER) Red Bull Racing celebrates with the team.
Formula One World Championship, Rd13, Singapore Grand Prix, Race, Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore, Sunday, 22 September 2013 (L to R): Fernando Alonso (ESP) Ferrari, Christian Horner (GBR) Red Bull Racing Team Principal, race winner Sebastian Vettel (GER) Red Bull Racing and Kimi Raikkonen (FIN) Lotus F1 celebrate on the podium.
Formula One World Championship, Rd13, Singapore G

Such was Sebastian Vettel’s level of dominance at the last round in Singapore, it provoked speculation over whether Red Bull had discovered a way to circumvent the rules and provide his car with some form of traction control. When asked about it ahead of this weekend’s 2013 Formula 1 Korean Grand Prix, Vettel was in light-hearted mood as he teased journalists on the topic, as well as playing down the effect of fans booing him…

Q: Sebastian, there was a lot of hype about the Red Bull ‘traction control’ in Singapore. Can you explain the state of affairs?
Sebastian Vettel:
Well, of course, as everybody witnessed it worked in Singapore. We’d been working on it all Friday and Saturday, and yes, on Sunday it worked perfectly for the first time - when it mattered. I am sure for the races to come that we will be able to enhance the system even further - to profit even more.

Q: Will that mean that from now on you will lap all your competitors?
SV:
Ha, probably not here in Korea, as the system is not that crucial here. But on other courses to come, my guess is that it will make a difference.

Q: Isn’t it a fact that when a driver keeps winning, the others start to whisper that there must be something on the car, that they must be cheating, or something along those lines?
SV:
Everybody has the right to his own opinion - and to express that. And everybody can see with his own eyes what is going on. As for us, I think we take all these whispers with a sense of humour.

Q: The notion you put forward in Singapore - that you are still working when others are sat by the pool - caused quite a stir. Were you surprised?
SV:
I found that all a bit strange, because it was never my intention to criticize others. I wanted to express that our success is not coming from nowhere, but that we are willing to do what it takes to be successful, even if that means working until late. Because there is always something that you can do better, something that you can learn. If you’re on a winning streak and start to take things too easy, this might be the surest way to terminate it.

Q: Others do work hard too - otherwise they’d be out of the sport very quickly - which leads to the conclusion that you must do it better. Can you try to explain that?
SV:
This is not only a question of quantity - how many more hours you put in - but very much about quality. I have very little information about what others are doing, but I can say that we’re one of the hardest working teams and thus deserve to be where we are right now.

Q: How are you dealing with the ‘boos’ that seem to be some sort of by-product of another win?
SV:
I am relaxed about it. I think the media exaggerate this matter. It is not that hordes of people boo - it is only a small percentage. And isn’t it so that every fan has the right to cheer for his own team and show disappointment when the others win? I think those who booed were Ferrari fans who obviously were disappointed that we again finished ahead of them. No big deal for us. The thing that matters is to know that we again did everything right - that you can be satisfied with your performance.

Q: All your driver colleagues support you, whether it is Fernando (Alonso) or Lewis (Hamilton), and think that these boos are extremely unfair. In that moment on the podium - the moment of success - isn’t it a bitter taste hearing these negative sounds? SV: Sure, in that second it is not great when you celebrate a win and others boo. But as I tried to explain before, for die-hard fans it is a disappointment when their team gets beaten and beaten again - and booing is their reaction. You have that in every sport.

Q: So it is not giving winning a bad taste?
SV:
No, on the contrary.

Q: Are you expecting to keep your dominance this weekend?
SV:
I never expect the continuation of dominance, because I know what lies behind being dominant. Yes, we’ve done fantastic in the last few races, but that does not mean that you can bank on it to continue everywhere. We do have a strong package - that is a fact. How strong, the weekend will show. Korea is a track that in general suits us and our car is very strong in the races this season, so I hopefully will go into a good weekend. In Singapore we had something of a ‘luxurious situation’ in that towards the end we could even take it a bit easier and reduce the speed. Let’s hope that it’s going to be the same this Sunday. Keep the fingers crossed!

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