RACE DEBRIEF

    Raikkonen's race long pursuit of team mate Sebastian Vettel may have been thwarted - bit even without victory, it was a record-breaking performance from the Finn nonetheless…

    • Kimi Raikkonen has now raced in Hungary 15 times, and on six occasions he's finished in second place. In total he has scored eight rostrums at the Hungaroring, which is the joint most he has scored at any one circuit (he also has eight at Bahrain).

    • The Iceman's eighth podium also establishes a new record for the Hungaroring. Coming into the weekend Raikkonen had shared the record for most rostrums at the circuit with Michael Schumacher and Ayrton Senna.

    • But Raikkonen's podium wasn't just a significant milestone for him, it meant a lot to Ferrari too... it gave the Prancing Horse their first one-two in Hungary since Michael Schumacher led home Rubens Barrichello in 2004.

    • That race was notable because it was the last time that the winner in Hungary also went on to win the world title in the same year. Will Vettel, whose victory was his second in Hungary, his fourth of the year, his first in five races and his 46th overall, break that streak this year?

    Formula One World Championship
    Michael Schumacher was the last man to win in Hungary and clinch the championship, back in 2004 © Sutton Motorsport Images
    • Behind the red cars, Lewis Hamilton's sportsmanship ensured that Valtteri Bottas collected his fifth successive podium – the longest current streak on the grid. By contrast, Hamilton now has just one podium in his last four races.

    • Max Verstappen's high-profile clash with Daniel Ricciardo on the first lap meant that for the eighth time in 11 races Red Bull saw only one of their drivers score points. Their raced kilometres tally of 4,518 remains the lowest of any team on the grid and a full 1,975km behind that of Mercedes, who've racked up the most.

    • McLaren have accumulated the second lowest tally of raced kilometres of any team this season, but Hungary saw them get both cars home in the points for the first time this season. Stoffel Vandoorne's hard earned point was his first since he scored on his debut in Bahrain last year during a one-race cameo substituting for Fernando Alonso.

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    Felipe Massa's absence meant there was no Brazilian on the grid for the first time in F1 since San Marino in 1982. © LAT Photographic
    • Speaking of Alonso, sixth place represented the Spaniard's second top ten finish of the year and his best result since finishing fifth in the USA last October. Amazingly the recently turned 36-year-old has scored in each of his last eight races at the Hungaroring, and in 12 of his 16 Grands Prix at the venue in total.

    • Alonso also picked up the fastest lap for the 23rd time in his career, and only the second time since 2013. His last fastest lap came last year in Italy, though that, unlike his one in Budapest, owed much to a late pit stop for fresh tyres.

    • In contrast to McLaren, Force India, who have completed only two kilometres fewer than Mercedes this year, scores points with both cars for the ninth time in 11 races. Once again it was Sergio Perez finishing in front of Esteban Ocon, but the young Frenchman enters the summer break with one more top ten slot to his name than the Mexican having scored in all but one race.

    • Ocon also maintained his impressive 100 percent finishing record since he entered F1 with Manor last season, having now reached the chequered flag in 20 successive races. He has more points finishes to his record than any driver outside the top three.

    Formula One World Championship
    Esteban Ocon has finished in the points on 10 occasions this season - more than anyone outside the top three. © Sutton Images
    • What made Force India's six-point haul in Hungary all the more impressive was that they came into the race having scored just one point since 2011 at the Hungaroring. The man who finished in the points that day six years ago was a certain Paul Di Resta, who made his first F1 start in 1,345 days (just over three and a half years!) as a stand-in for the unwell Felipe Massa.

    • The Scot's leave of absence - dating back to the 2013 Brazilian Grand Prix - isn't the longest on record. That honour goes to Dutchman Jan Lammers who endured a gap of 3,767 days between the 1982 Dutch Grand Prix and the 1992 Japanese Grand Prix.

    • The last race Massa missed incidentally was the 2009 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, which was as a result of the injuries he sustained in an accident in Hungary earlier that season. You have to go all the way back to the 1982 San Marino Grand Prix to find the last race without a Brazilian driver on the grid. Will Massa be back on the grid when the action resumes in Belgium at the end of August?

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