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Alonso: Frustrations don't undermine McLaren commitment

08 Oct 2015

Fernando Alonso has emphasised he will be staying with McLaren in 2016 and '17 after downplaying the significance of his radio frustrations during the recent 2015 Formula 1 Japanese Grand Prix.

Alonso criticised McLaren’s Honda power unit during the Suzuka race - labelling it a 'GP2 engine' and later saying that being passed on the straights was 'very embarrassing' - prompting questions in some quarters about his future F1 plans.

But when asked on Thursday in Russia if he will remain with the team next year, the Spanish driver replied: "Yes. Of course. And 2017.

"On Sunday [in Japan] it was just the frustration of battling hard and being a competitive sportsman. When you are in a car, in a race and you try to give it all and you are fighting lap after lap and you keep losing positions easily on the straight, even before the braking point, you get some frustration out there on the radio.

"You know sometimes it's normal and understandable - the level of frustration and the level of commitment when you are battling and you cannot hold anyone behind and you are losing positions is normal."

Alonso stressed that the 'most important' aspect of his time in Japan had been a visit he had made to the Honda factory on the Wednesday prior to the race.

"I saw the engine programme for next year," he explained. "We had very long meetings and we went through all the difficulties that we are facing right now and all the possible solutions that we want for next year. I think on Wednesday it was much more important than Sunday."

Alonso also reiterated his view that radio messages should be more private, adding: "Obviously we have been all season very positive, about the team and about the car. We faced some difficult times, some tough times, and what you talk on the radio should remain private because you are talking with your team not publically. I think publically, as I said, we have been very, very positive all the time.

"This is a very unique sport, that we have a microphone in our helmet and it goes live on television. Imagine in NBA or football players or something like that what we can find. This is normal and it's just talking to the team, it's understandable the frustration with the car.

"I'm happy it was only broadcast in Suzuka because if you hear all the races, all the radio messages from me or from Jenson [Button] or whatever, you will be even more surprised."